C86 Show - Indie Pop
Neil Oram in conversation

Neil Oram in conversation

September 6, 2021

Neil Oram in conversation with David Eastaugh

In 1956 Oram traveled to Africa where he met musician Mike Gibbs in Salisbury, (now Harare). He played double bass in the Mike Gibbs Quintet with Gibbs on piano, vibes and trombone. A post-concert epiphany where a voice repeatedly told him "Je suis un poet!" led him to take up writing. Oram returned to Britain in 1958 where he ran a jazz café called The House of Sam Widges at 8 D'Arblay Street in Soho, London.The café was known for its jukebox which only had modern jazz records. It attracted many of the top London musicians. Ronnie Scott, Tubby Hayes, Graham Bond, Dave Tomlin and Bobby Wellins were frequent customers, occasionally enjoying a bowl of spaghetti bolognese crafted by Oram. Downstairs was a club/performance space called 'The Pad'.

Oram was now writing poetry, giving readings and painting large abstract jazz inspired paintings. In 1960 he opened The Mingus art gallery in Marshall Street, Soho where abstract paintings by O. G. Bradbury, George Popperwell, Jaime Manzano, Tony Shiels and William Morris the American beat poet/action painter could be seen. Morris's huge, jazz paintings were executed in The Pad to the vibrant sounds of the Graham Bond Quartet, then carried round the corner and hung up wet in The Mingus.

Laurence Myers - talking David Bowie, music & his new book Hunky Dory

Laurence Myers - talking David Bowie, music & his new book Hunky Dory

December 11, 2020

Laurence Myers - talking David Bowie, music & his new book Hunky Dory with David Eastaugh 

Laurence Myers is a Theatre and Film Producer. He was formerly a Music Executive, owning and running record and artist management companies.

First coming to prominence as a Financial Advisor/ Accountant to The Rolling Stones and other leading artists in the 1960s, Laurence entered the music business full-time in 1970, signing then unproven David Bowie to his record label ‘Gem’.

In an impressive career in the music world spanning decades, Laurence’s companies represented artists including The Animals, Herman’s Hermits, The Kinks, Led Zeppelin, Donovan, Lionel Bart, Heatwave, The New Seekers, Alan Price, The Tremeloes, The Sweet, Donna Summer, Scott Walker and Billy Ocean, as well as advising The Beatles on their Apple Corp venture.

Dana Gillespie in conversation

Dana Gillespie in conversation

November 24, 2020

Dana Gillespie in conversation  with David Eastaugh

Dana Gillespie recorded initially in the folk genre in the mid-1960s. Some of her recordings as a teenager fell into the teen pop category, such as her 1965 single "Thank You Boy", written by John Carter and Ken Lewis and produced by Jimmy Page. Her acting career got under way shortly afterwards, and it overshadowed her musical career in the late 1960s and 1970s.

The song "Andy Warhol" was originally written by David Bowie for Gillespie, who recorded it in 1971, but her version of the song was not released until 1973 on her album Weren't Born a Man. Her version also featured Mick Ronson on guitar. After performing backing vocals on the track "It Ain't Easy" from Bowie's Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, she recorded an album produced by Bowie and Mick Ronson in 1973, Weren't Born a Man. Subsequent recordings have been in the blues genre, appearing with the London Blues Band. She is also notable for being the original Mary Magdalene in the first London production of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice's Jesus Christ Superstar, which opened at the Palace Theatre in 1972. She also appeared on the Original London Cast album. During the 1980s Gillespie was a member of the Austrian Mojo Blues Band.

Joey Arias in conversation

Joey Arias in conversation

October 27, 2020

Joey Arias in conversation with David Eastaugh 

Joey Arias is a multi-talented artist based in New York City, best known for work as a performance artist, cabaret singer, and drag artist, but also known as a published author, comedian, stage persona and cult-movie star. He also goes by the names Joseph Arias and Joe Arias.

The Cockettes special with Pam Tent

The Cockettes special with Pam Tent

October 8, 2020

The Cockettes with Pam Tent in conversation with David Eastaugh

The Cockettes were an avant garde psychedelic hippie theater group founded by Hibiscus(George Edgerly Harris III)[1] in the fall of 1969. The troupe was formed out of a group of hippie artists, men and women, who were living in Kaliflower, one of the many communes in Haight-Ashbury, a neighborhood of San Francisco, California. Hibiscus came to live with them because of their preference for dressing outrageously and proposed the idea of putting their lifestyle on the stage.

Their brand of theater was influenced by The Living Theater, John Vaccaro's Play House of the Ridiculous, the films of Jack Smith and the LSD ethos of Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters. The troupe performed all original material, staging musicals with original songs. The first year they parodied American musicals and sang show tunes (or original musical comedies in the same vein). They gained an underground cult following that led to mainstream exposure.

Karl Minns special - Nimmo Twins

Karl Minns special - Nimmo Twins

April 25, 2020

Karl Minns in conversation - talking about comedy, writing, performing & much much more with David Eastaugh

The Nimmo Twins are a sketch comedy duo from Norfolk, UK comprising Owen Evans and Karl Minns. Formed in 1996 in Norwich, they first came to national attention after their show Posh Spice Nude was a sell-out success at the 1997 Edinburgh Festival. Appearances on BBC One's Stand Up Show followed and they became regulars on Radio 4's Loose Ends programme with Ned Sherrin. They returned to Edinburgh in 1998 and 1999, selling out in critically acclaimed shows both years. They toured Britain, played Paris, New York and two sell-out years at the Singapore Comedy Festival.

 

The Cockettes special with Fayette Hauser

The Cockettes special with Fayette Hauser

April 7, 2020

The Cockettes special with Fayette Hauser in conversation with David Eastaugh

The Cockettes were an avant garde psychedelic hippie theater group founded by Hibiscus (George Edgerly Harris III) in the fall of 1969. The troupe was formed out of a group of hippie artists, men and women, who were living in Kaliflower, one of the many communes in Haight-Ashbury, a neighborhood of San Francisco, California. Hibiscus came to live with them because of their preference for dressing outrageously and proposed the idea of putting their lifestyle on the stage.

Their brand of theater was influenced by The Living Theater, John Vaccaro's Play House of the Ridiculous, the films of Jack Smith and the LSD ethos of Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters. The troupe performed all original material, staging musicals with original songs. The first year they parodied American musicals and sang show tunes (or original musical comedies in the same vein). They gained an underground cult following that led to mainstream exposure.

The Cockettes were the subject of a 2002 documentary titled The Cockettes and directed by David Weissman and Bill Weber.

Tony Zanetta - talking Andy Warhol, David Bowie, Pork & much much more

Tony Zanetta - talking Andy Warhol, David Bowie, Pork & much much more

March 20, 2020

Tony Zanetta - talking Andy Warhol, David Bowie, Pork & much much more

Tony Zanetta is a foundational gure in the history of 1960s and ’70s underground New York and London, and thereafter a secret in uence on all the androgyny in punk and rock music, the radical queerness in theater, the marrying of camp and pomp on stage and in lm... all the multifarious worlds that sprang up—and that continue to do so— lled with inspiration from those heady times. Zanetta was an actor in the off-off-Broadway movement that gained full force in the radical theater of the Play-House of the Ridiculous and Company One (Through Seven). He was present as the habitués of the original Silver Factory speed-rapped at Max’s Kansas City. Later, he saw the nascent punk scene taking form at the Mercer Arts Center. He starred as the man himself in Andy Warhol’s 1971 play Pork, a New York sensation that traveled to London, where it was digested whole by Hunky Dory–era David Bowie. Soon, Zanetta found himself tour-managing Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust global tour. As Bowie and Zanetta became con dants, he and other Pork stars formed the nucleus of MainMan, the production company whose clients included Bowie, Iggy Pop, Dana Gillespie, and Mott the Hoople.

The conversation below is excerpted from a larger body of interviews between Zanetta and the writer Steve Lafreniere. Here, Steve and Tony talk at length about the through line of New York underground theater, the bisexual chic of Bowie and the New York Dolls, and the radical queens of days gone by.

Bruce Lacey in conversation

Bruce Lacey in conversation

February 5, 2020

Bruce Lacey in conversation with David Eastaugh

Penny Arcade in conversation

Penny Arcade in conversation

October 8, 2019

Penny Arcade in conversation with David Eastaugh 

Lucy Porter in conversation

Lucy Porter in conversation

October 8, 2019

Lucy Porter in conversation with David Eastaugh

Arthur Smith in conversation

Arthur Smith in conversation

October 6, 2019

Arthur Smith in conversation with David Eastaugh

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