C86 Show - Indie Pop
Gaye Bykers On Acid & Crazyhead - Rich Deakin talking about his new book Grebo!

Gaye Bykers On Acid & Crazyhead - Rich Deakin talking about his new book Grebo!

December 19, 2021

Gaye Bykers On Acid & Crazyhead - Rich Deakin talking about his new book Grebo! with David Eastaugh 

‘Grebo’ was a media constructed music genre that even today sends a shudder down the spines of discerning music fans and critics. A homegrown proto-grunge — counterpart to the likes of Butthole Surfers, Mudhoney, early Nirvana, Alice In Chains, and Soundgarden in the US  — grebo was a British phenomenon that drew on an eclectic range of influences, from punk, 60s garage and psychedelia, through to 70s heavy rock and thrash metal. It foreshadowed rave culture and was steeped in class politics.

GAYE BYKERS ON ACID and CRAZYHEAD hailed from Leicester. They were not the first bands to be labelled grebo but they were the most unashamedly unkempt and came to be considered its greatest exponents. They were “a burst of dirty thunder” and almost no one liked them.

Based on interviews with band members, friends, fans, and roadies, this book is an uncompromising history of an overlooked music scene. Rich Deakin charts its course via the changing fortunes of the Bykers and Crazyhead, taking us on the booze-filled tour buses, behind the dodgy deals and onto the international stage and back again (with a pitstop for a rock movie that swallows lots of money). Their careers were short, but the two bands managed to shake up the UK indie scene and along the way became Britain’s unlikely ambassadors of rock following the collapse of Soviet Russia.

Lenny Kaye - Patti Smith, Suzanne Vega & author of Lightning Striking

Lenny Kaye - Patti Smith, Suzanne Vega & author of Lightning Striking

November 25, 2021

Lenny Kaye - Patti Smith, Suzanne Vega & author of Lightning Striking in conversation with David Eastaugh

As musician, writer, and record producer, Kaye was intimately involved with an array of artists and bands. He was a guitarist for poet/rocker Patti Smith from her band's inception in 1974, and co-authored Waylon, The Life Story of Waylon Jennings. He worked in the studio with such artists as R.E.M., James, Suzanne Vega, Jim Carroll, Soul Asylum, Kristin Hersh, and Allen Ginsberg. His seminal anthology of sixties' garage-rock, Nuggets, is widely regarded as defining the genre.You Call It Madness: The Sensuous Song of the Croon, an impressionistic study of the romantic singers of the 1930s, was published by Villard/Random House in 2014

Duncan Hannah in conversation

Duncan Hannah in conversation

October 1, 2021

Duncan Hannah in conversation with David Eastaugh

Celebrated painter Duncan Hannah arrived in New York City from Minneapolis in the early 1970s as an art student hungry for experience, game for almost anything, and with a prodigious taste for drugs, girls, alcohol, movies, rock and roll, books, parties, and everything else the city had to offer.

Taken directly from the notebooks Hannah kept throughout the decade, Twentieth-Century Boy is a fascinating, sometimes lurid, and incredibly entertaining report from a now almost mythical time and place. Full of outrageously bad behavior, naked ambition, fantastically good music, and evaporating barriers of taste and decorum, and featuring cameos from David Bowie, Andy Warhol, Patti Smith, and many more, it is a rollicking account of an artist's coming of age.

Neil Oram in conversation

Neil Oram in conversation

September 6, 2021

Neil Oram in conversation with David Eastaugh

In 1956 Oram traveled to Africa where he met musician Mike Gibbs in Salisbury, (now Harare). He played double bass in the Mike Gibbs Quintet with Gibbs on piano, vibes and trombone. A post-concert epiphany where a voice repeatedly told him "Je suis un poet!" led him to take up writing. Oram returned to Britain in 1958 where he ran a jazz café called The House of Sam Widges at 8 D'Arblay Street in Soho, London.The café was known for its jukebox which only had modern jazz records. It attracted many of the top London musicians. Ronnie Scott, Tubby Hayes, Graham Bond, Dave Tomlin and Bobby Wellins were frequent customers, occasionally enjoying a bowl of spaghetti bolognese crafted by Oram. Downstairs was a club/performance space called 'The Pad'.

Oram was now writing poetry, giving readings and painting large abstract jazz inspired paintings. In 1960 he opened The Mingus art gallery in Marshall Street, Soho where abstract paintings by O. G. Bradbury, George Popperwell, Jaime Manzano, Tony Shiels and William Morris the American beat poet/action painter could be seen. Morris's huge, jazz paintings were executed in The Pad to the vibrant sounds of the Graham Bond Quartet, then carried round the corner and hung up wet in The Mingus.

Jerry Rubin special with Pat Thomas

Jerry Rubin special with Pat Thomas

July 21, 2021

Pat Thomas talking about the life of Jerry Rubin & his book Did It! with David Eastaugh

First biography of the infamous and ubiquitous Jerry Rubin- ”co-founder of the Yippies, Anti-Vietnam War activist, Chicago 8 defendant, social-networking pioneer, and a proponent of the Yuppie era”but a visual retrospective, with countless candid photos, personal diaries, and lost newspaper clippings. It includes correspondence with Abbie Hoffman, Norman Mailer, John Lennon & Yoko Ono, Eldridge Cleaver, the Weathermen etc

Barney Hoskyns

Barney Hoskyns

July 19, 2021

Barney Hoskyns in conversation talking about his life in music and new book God is in the Radio with David Eastaugh 

 

Barney Hoskyns is the co-founder and editorial director of Rock's Backpages, the online library of pop writing and journalism. He began writing for NME in the early '80s and is a former contributing editor at British Vogue and U.S. correspondent for MOJO

The Shend special - The Cravats, Very Things, Grimetime

The Shend special - The Cravats, Very Things, Grimetime

June 21, 2021

The Shend special - The Cravats, Very Things, Grimetime - talking about his new book Rub Me Out with David Eastaugh

The Cravats are an English punk rock band originally from Redditch, England, founded in 1977. The 'classic' line up of Robin Dallaway (vocals, guitar), The Shend (vocals, bass guitar), Svor Naan (saxophone) and Dave Bennett (drums) remained constant between March / April 1978 until the close of 1982. Lead vocals in the original incarnation of the band were shared between Dallaway and The Shend. A reformed version of The Cravats including original members The Shend (vocals) and Svor Naan (saxophone), with Rampton Garstang (drums) has been performing since August 2009 and, since 2013 has included Viscount Biscuits (guitar) and Joe 91 (bass guitar)

Nancy Barile - I’m Not Holding Your Coat

Nancy Barile - I’m Not Holding Your Coat

June 8, 2021

Nancy Barile author of 'I'm Not Holding Your Coat: My Bruises-and-All Memoir of Punk Rock Rebellion' in conversation with David Eastaugh 

From Catholic school girl to glam maniac to organiser of classic early 1980s East Coast hardcore shows, Nancy Barile made her place behind the boards and right in the front row as SSD, Minor Threat, Bad Brains, Dead Kennedys, and Black Flag wrote new rules. In the dangerous early years of punk, she rebelled, fighting for fair space as she found her purpose.

Duran Duran special with author Annie Zaleski

Duran Duran special with author Annie Zaleski

May 29, 2021

Duran Duran special with author Annie Zaleski talking about her new book on the band with David Eastaugh

In the '80s, the Birmingham, England, quintet Duran Duran became the poster boys for new wave, a synth-heavy genre that dominated the decade's music and culture. No album represented this rip-it-up-and-start-again movement better than the band's breakthrough 1982 LP, Rio. A cohesive album with a retro-futuristic sound-influences include danceable disco, tangy funk, Bowie-caliber synth-pop and swaggering glam-the full-length sold millions and spawned smashes such as "Hungry Like the Wolf" and the title track.

Miles Copeland - The Police, REM, IRS Records

Miles Copeland - The Police, REM, IRS Records

May 4, 2021

Miles Copeland in conversation with David Eastaugh - talking about his new book, Two Steps Forward, One Step Back

Two Steps Forward, One Step Back tells the extraordinary story of a maverick manager, promoter, label owner, and all-round legend of the music industry. It opens in the Middle East, where Miles grew up with his father, a CIA agent who was stationed in Syria, Egypt, and Lebanon. It then shifts to London in the late 60s and the beginnings of a career managing bands like Wishbone Ash and Curved Air - only for Miles's life and work to be turned upside down by a pioneering yet disastrous European tour.

Christine Feldman-Barrett - A Women’s History of the Beatles

Christine Feldman-Barrett - A Women’s History of the Beatles

May 4, 2021

Christine Feldman-Barrett - author or A Women’s History of the Beatles - in conversation with David Eastaugh

A Women's History of the Beatles is the first book to offer a detailed presentation of the band's social and cultural impact as understood through the experiences and lives of women. Drawing on a mix of interviews, archival research, textual analysis, and autoethnography, this scholarly work depicts how the Beatles have profoundly shaped and enriched the lives of women, while also reexamining key, influential female figures within the group's history.

Joel Selvin - Hollywood Eden: Electric Guitars, Fast Cars, and the Myth of the California Paradise

Joel Selvin - Hollywood Eden: Electric Guitars, Fast Cars, and the Myth of the California Paradise

April 29, 2021

Joel Selvin in conversation with David Eastaugh

From the Beach Boys and Jan & Dean to the Byrds and the Mamas & the Papas, acclaimed music journalist Joel Selvin tells the story of a group of young artists and musicians who came together at the dawn of the 1960s to create the lasting myth of the California dream.

Compelling, evocative, and ultimately tragic, Hollywood Eden travels far beyond the music into the desires of the human heart and the price of living out a dream. A rock 'n' roll opera loaded with violence, deceit, intrigue, low comedy, and high drama, it tells the story of a group of young artists and musicians who bumped heads, crashed cars, and ultimately flew too close to the sun.

Nick Kent in conversation

Nick Kent in conversation

February 14, 2021

Nick Kent in conversation with David Eastaugh 

In the mid-70s, Kent played guitar with an early incarnation of the Sex Pistols,[2] and performed briefly with members of the early punk band London SS, under the name Subterraneans. Brian James, later of The Damned, said of him: "Nick is a great guitarist, he plays just like Keith Richards. He's always trying to get a band together but he just can't do it. Nerves, I guess. It's a shame, though, because he loves rock 'n' roll and he's a great bloke."[3]

Kent's relationship with the punk scene was strained. Already a well-known music critic and a symbol of the music industry, he was assaulted by Sid Vicious with a motorcycle chain in the 100 Club. Kent relates the incident in Johnny Rogan's book on rock management, Starmakers & Svengalis; in The Filth and the Fury, director Julien Temple's 2000 documentary of the Sex Pistols; in Jon Savage's book England's Dreaming; as well as in his own books, The Dark Stuff and Apathy for the Devil. Despite this infamous incident, Vicious claimed in a 1977 interview that Kent was 'good fun' and that 'he bought me a meal a little while ago, it was really nice of him'. 

Michael Grecco in conversation

Michael Grecco in conversation

December 16, 2020

Michael Grecco in conversation with David Eastaugh

Photographer and filmmaker Michael Grecco was in the thick of things, documenting the club scene in places like Boston and New York as punk rock morphed into the post-punk and new wave movements that dominated from the late ’70s to the early ’90s. From Sex Pistols to Blondie, Talking Heads, Human Sexual Response, Elvis Costello, Joan Jett, The Ramones, and many others, Grecco captured in black and white and color the raw energy, sweat, and antics that characterized the alternative music of the time. In addition to concert photography, he shot album covers and promotional pieces that round out his impressively extensive photo collection. The Grammy Museum in Los Angeles has offered Grecco an exhibition of his photographs to coincide with publication.

 

David Godlis in conversation

David Godlis in conversation

December 14, 2020

David Godlis in conversation with David Eastaugh

David Godlis, who is best known by his last name GODLIS, has been photographing in New York City since 1976. A “street photographer” in the style of Diane Arbus and Garry Winogrand, he wandered into the nightclub CBGB's one night, and has become known for his photographs of the NYC Punk scene.

Godlis Streets is the first book dedicated to the artist and photographer's incredible body of work and focuses on the 1970s and 1980s. Godlis's street photographs from this time capture moments of mundanity, humour and pathos; his gift for acute observation and impeccable framing elevating these images to the extraordinary. A definition of what sincere street photography can and should be, Godlis Streets is the very best photography of its kind. The book is introduced by a foreword by Luc Sante and an afterword by Chris Stein.

Laurence Myers - talking David Bowie, music & his new book Hunky Dory

Laurence Myers - talking David Bowie, music & his new book Hunky Dory

December 11, 2020

Laurence Myers - talking David Bowie, music & his new book Hunky Dory with David Eastaugh 

Laurence Myers is a Theatre and Film Producer. He was formerly a Music Executive, owning and running record and artist management companies.

First coming to prominence as a Financial Advisor/ Accountant to The Rolling Stones and other leading artists in the 1960s, Laurence entered the music business full-time in 1970, signing then unproven David Bowie to his record label ‘Gem’.

In an impressive career in the music world spanning decades, Laurence’s companies represented artists including The Animals, Herman’s Hermits, The Kinks, Led Zeppelin, Donovan, Lionel Bart, Heatwave, The New Seekers, Alan Price, The Tremeloes, The Sweet, Donna Summer, Scott Walker and Billy Ocean, as well as advising The Beatles on their Apple Corp venture.

Dana Gillespie in conversation

Dana Gillespie in conversation

November 24, 2020

Dana Gillespie in conversation  with David Eastaugh

Dana Gillespie recorded initially in the folk genre in the mid-1960s. Some of her recordings as a teenager fell into the teen pop category, such as her 1965 single "Thank You Boy", written by John Carter and Ken Lewis and produced by Jimmy Page. Her acting career got under way shortly afterwards, and it overshadowed her musical career in the late 1960s and 1970s.

The song "Andy Warhol" was originally written by David Bowie for Gillespie, who recorded it in 1971, but her version of the song was not released until 1973 on her album Weren't Born a Man. Her version also featured Mick Ronson on guitar. After performing backing vocals on the track "It Ain't Easy" from Bowie's Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, she recorded an album produced by Bowie and Mick Ronson in 1973, Weren't Born a Man. Subsequent recordings have been in the blues genre, appearing with the London Blues Band. She is also notable for being the original Mary Magdalene in the first London production of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice's Jesus Christ Superstar, which opened at the Palace Theatre in 1972. She also appeared on the Original London Cast album. During the 1980s Gillespie was a member of the Austrian Mojo Blues Band.

Some Wear Leather, Some Wear Lace: The Worldwide Compendium of Postpunk and Goth in the 1980s - Marloes Bontje

Some Wear Leather, Some Wear Lace: The Worldwide Compendium of Postpunk and Goth in the 1980s - Marloes Bontje

March 3, 2020

Marloes Bontje - co-author of Some Wear Leather, Some Wear Lace: The Worldwide Compendium of Postpunk and Goth in the 1980s - in conversation with David Eastaugh 

It was a scene that had many names: some original members referred to themselves as punks, others new romantics, new wavers, the bats, or the morbids. "Goth" did not gain lexical currency until the late 1980s. But no matter what term was used, "postpunk" encompasses all the incarnations of the 1980s alternative movement. Some Wear Leather, Some Wear Lace is a visual and oral history of the first decade of the scene. Featuring interviews with both the performers and the audience to capture the community on and off stage, the book places personal snapshots alongside professional photography to reveal a unique range of fashions, bands, and scenes. A book about the music, the individual, and the creativity of a worldwide community rather than theoretical definitions of a subculture, Some Wear Leather, Some Wear Lace considers a subject not often covered by academic books. Whether you were part of the scene or are just fascinated by different modes of expression, this book will transport you to another time and place.

 

Vinca Peterson in conversation

Vinca Peterson in conversation

February 16, 2020
“Vinca Petersen is a photographer, installation, multimedia, and performance artist who works in the area of social practice. All of her works, including her photography, emerge from her deep social and political engagement with underrepresented communities in order to give them a voice and recognition”.
– Dr Mark Bartlett
Bob Mazzer in conversation

Bob Mazzer in conversation

February 5, 2020

Bob Mazzer in conversation with David Eastaugh

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