C86 Show - Indie Pop
Robin Mayhew talking about David Bowie, Presidents, Lou Reed & much more

Robin Mayhew talking about David Bowie, Presidents, Lou Reed & much more

January 18, 2021

Robin Mayhew talking about David Bowie, Presidents, Lou Reed & much more with David Eastaugh 

Begun life in the Presidents from 1958 to 1965 - and then becoming a roadie and sound engineer for a band named "Tucky Buzzard", produced by Bill Wyman of the Rolling Stones. 

Tucky Buzzard had recently signed with the same management company that had signed David Bowie. Robin quickly became adept with the band's unique Turner PA system, a sound set-up that Bowie fell in love with. When David created his "Ziggy Stardust" persona he brought in Robin - along with the sound system - to handle his front-of-house sound. Robin engineered every Ziggy Stardust performance until Bowie broke-up the Spiders from Mars in 1973.

Hunt Sales on Iggy Pop, David Bowie & his life in music

Hunt Sales on Iggy Pop, David Bowie & his life in music

December 7, 2020

Hunt Sales on Iggy Pop, David Bowie & his life in music - in conversation with David Eastaugh

Hunt Sales' first group was with brother Tony in Tony and the Tigers. They appeared on Hullabaloo in 1966, and also on the local Detroit/Windsor dance show Swingin' Time with Robin Seymour.

In 1976, he played drums with the hard rock power trio Paris, formed by former Fleetwood Mac guitarist/songwriter Bob Welch. This trio (which included ex-Jethro Tull bassist Glenn Cornick) was short-lived, releasing two albums for Capitol Records. Hunt played and sang backing vocals on the second Paris album, Big Towne, 2061.

In 1977, along with his brother Tony, Hunt provided the rhythm section for the Iggy Pop album Lust for Life. David Bowie's memories of the Sales brothers' contribution to the recording led him to invite the pair to join Tin Machine in the late 1980s.

Dana Gillespie in conversation

Dana Gillespie in conversation

November 24, 2020

Dana Gillespie in conversation  with David Eastaugh

Dana Gillespie recorded initially in the folk genre in the mid-1960s. Some of her recordings as a teenager fell into the teen pop category, such as her 1965 single "Thank You Boy", written by John Carter and Ken Lewis and produced by Jimmy Page. Her acting career got under way shortly afterwards, and it overshadowed her musical career in the late 1960s and 1970s.

The song "Andy Warhol" was originally written by David Bowie for Gillespie, who recorded it in 1971, but her version of the song was not released until 1973 on her album Weren't Born a Man. Her version also featured Mick Ronson on guitar. After performing backing vocals on the track "It Ain't Easy" from Bowie's Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, she recorded an album produced by Bowie and Mick Ronson in 1973, Weren't Born a Man. Subsequent recordings have been in the blues genre, appearing with the London Blues Band. She is also notable for being the original Mary Magdalene in the first London production of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice's Jesus Christ Superstar, which opened at the Palace Theatre in 1972. She also appeared on the Original London Cast album. During the 1980s Gillespie was a member of the Austrian Mojo Blues Band.

Joey Arias in conversation

Joey Arias in conversation

October 27, 2020

Joey Arias in conversation with David Eastaugh 

Joey Arias is a multi-talented artist based in New York City, best known for work as a performance artist, cabaret singer, and drag artist, but also known as a published author, comedian, stage persona and cult-movie star. He also goes by the names Joseph Arias and Joe Arias.

David Bowie special with George Underwood in conversation

David Bowie special with George Underwood in conversation

October 6, 2019

David Bowie special with George Underwood in conversation with David Eastaugh

Nicholas Pegg - The Complete David Bowie

Nicholas Pegg - The Complete David Bowie

September 12, 2019

Nicholas Pegg discussing his latest book The Complete David Bowie - with David Eastaugh

Critically acclaimed in its previous editions, The Complete David Bowie is recognized as the foremost source of analysis and information on every facet of Bowie’s work. The A-Z of songs and the day-by-day dateline are the most complete ever published. From his boyhood skiffle performance at the 18th Bromley Scouts’ Summer Camp, to the majesty of his final masterpiece Blackstar, every aspect of David Bowie’s extraordinary career is explored and dissected by Nicholas Pegg’s unrivalled combination of in-depth knowledge and penetrating insight.

Mike Garson special - David Bowie

Mike Garson special - David Bowie

September 12, 2019

Mike Garson in conversation with David Eastaugh - recorded 28th January 2016

Garson was David Bowie’s longest and most frequent band member. They performed together for both Bowie's first and last concerts in the United States as well as 1,000 concerts around the globe in between.

Garson provided the piano and keyboard backing on the later Ziggy Stardust tour of 1972-73 and his contribution to the song "Aladdin Sane" (1973) gave the song an avant-garde jazz feel with lengthy and sometimes atonal piano solos.

I had told Bowie about the avant-garde thing. When I was recording the "Aladdin Sane" track for Bowie, it was just two chords, an A and a G chord, and the band was playing very simple English rock and roll. And Bowie said: 'play a solo on this.' I had just met him, so I played a blues solo, but then he said: 'No, that's not what I want.' And then I played a Latin solo. Again, Bowie said: 'No no, that's not what I want.' He then continued: 'You told me you play that avant-garde music. Play that stuff!' And I said: 'Are you sure? 'Cause you might not be working anymore!'. So I did the solo that everybody knows today, in one take. And to this day, I still receive emails about it. Every day. I always tell people that Bowie is the best producer I ever met, because he lets me do my thing.

Garson played also for Bowie's guitarist bandmate Mick Ronson on his first and last solo tour, and his first Slaughter on Tenth Avenue (1974) and second solo album Play Don't Worry (1975). Garson came to replace Ronson as Bowie's musical lieutenant on several occasions, notably on "We Are the Dead" from the 1974 Diamond Dogs album, where Garson's metronome-like keyboard provides a dramatic setting for Bowie's vocals, and on the title track to Young Americans (1975) where his jaunty piano leads the band. Garson played with Bowie on and off over the years, resurfacing on The Buddha of Suburbia (1993) and 1 Outside (1995).

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